wehadfacesthen:

Dancers from George Balanchine’s production of Orfeo ed Euridice for the Metropolitan Opera in a photo by George Platt Lynes, 1936
The dancers are Lew Christensen, Daphne Vane and William Dollar.

wehadfacesthen:

Dancers from George Balanchine’s production of Orfeo ed Euridice for the Metropolitan Opera in a photo by George Platt Lynes, 1936

The dancers are Lew Christensen, Daphne Vane and William Dollar.


Martin Scorsese + John Cassavetes

Martin Scorsese + John Cassavetes

(Source: johncassavetes, via bbook)

important.gif
I’m perpetually behind on TV watching; just now getting to Copper Season 2. This gorgeous shot made my night.

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I’m perpetually behind on TV watching; just now getting to Copper Season 2. This gorgeous shot made my night.

(Source: shapelesspooloflovelypalecolours)

Love to you all.

Love to you all.

(Source: papermagazine)

johndarnielle:

Barbra Streisand and Judy Garland singing their famous duet, "Get Happy/Happy Days are Here Again" on The Judy Garland Show in 1963. [x]

future generations remembered the unearthing of the 4-up Judy and Barbra animated gif. “some people kept trying to put animated gifs up after that” reports Professor Gumm of the University of Gif. “for a while really. but most people had to admit in the glaring all-healing light of Judy and Barbra that their own gif game was weak as hell”

Because I haven’t posted in eons. Hello!

(Source: thebeautyofbarbrastreisand)

daydream-loveletter:

New York City Ballet Vintage Costumes

I keep forgetting to apologize for my extended absence of late; after a stint of unemployment, I’ve been buried in the wonderfulness of my new position at the New York City Ballet. Be back soon!

xo, cindy hotpoint

Patrick Wolf — Born to Die (Lana Del Rey cover, live on Dermot O’Leary’s BBC 2 Radio show)

"

While the two never discussed at length what Freddie should look like, it quickly became clear to Anderson that Phoenix was losing a significant amount of weight to play this alcoholic fresh from the war. Phoenix also maintained an awkward gait, where he pulled his pelvis back, sucked in his stomach and placed his hands on his waist — a walk Anderson loved but never questioned.


“It’s like when you are playing make-believe with your kids and you are so tempted to ask them what they are thinking or why they are doing something but the last thing you want to do is break the spell,” said Anderson, who realized in the editing room that Phoenix was perhaps holding onto his kidneys because they hurt from either a war injury or from all the booze. “You just sort of hope they will keep doing it and they won’t stop. Whatever he was doing, it felt so right and looked so good, the last thing I wanted to do was stop and break the spell of make-believe and ask questions of why.”

"

parkslopepatrickstewart:

I can walk there from my house.

I’m sorry, Park Slope Patrick Stewart is ridiculously funny. The Co-op and Whole Foods jokes are hilairz, but this is the best one of them all, by far.

parkslopepatrickstewart:

I can walk there from my house.

I’m sorry, Park Slope Patrick Stewart is ridiculously funny. The Co-op and Whole Foods jokes are hilairz, but this is the best one of them all, by far.

Douglas Greed — When A Man Sings on a Track

My favorite thing, today. A “Losing My Edge” for the EDM resurgence. Perfect.

"You’re one of those guys that’s spent so much time taking about music that you’ve actually forgotten how to feel music …” 

[via the i-D Online: August Mixtape 2012] 

David Mancuso Live @ The Loft, NYC

I feel like I may have posted about this before, because it was put on Soundcloud over a year ago, but it crossed my Facebook feed via Tim Sweeney today, and it bears rementioning. You can download the whole 7-hour mix on the Soundclound page as the preview above is only about 30 minutes long. The full track list is there, too.

Oh, and it opens with one of my favorite Andreas Vollenweider tracks, which pretty much cements the overall awesomeness.

Happy Monday! From the 1986 Star Trek Alien Coloring Book
via The Best Scenes From Insane Old Star Trek Coloring Books:io9
texasmonthly:




A One-Question Interview with TJ Tucker, TEXAS MONTHLY’s creative director




How did the logo change? 


   There have been three iterations of the TEXAS MONTHLY logo since the magazine started in 1973. The original logo (seen at top) used Pistilli Roman, an existing typeface that was popular in the early seventies. When [former TEXAS MONTHLY art director] D.J. Stout changed the logo in 1990, he asked Dennis Ortiz Lopez to draw something taller and more compressed to achieve a look that he though would look better sitting at the top of a magazine. The ball terminals on the ‘a’ and the ‘y’ lost some of their weight and the letters were noticeably thinner. 



    I began working on the third version in 2008, and much like D.J., I let the previous versions of the logo inspire my decisions. I didn’t want to make drastic changes, but I wanted to add back in some of the character of the 1973 logo, which I loved. We brought back the fatter ball terminals and added very small ball terminals to the serif of the ‘e’ and the lowercase ‘t.’ We also brought back the curve at the top of the lowercase ‘t.’ The differences may seem minor, but to me, it’s the details that complete the experience. 


Because these kinds of things are rather important. I remember being a bit floored when I saw the new logo on a grocery store newsstand as a young teenager — I loved the sleekness and even-ness of the mid-period logo, but I am happy to see the delicate curve on the lower case ‘t’ and the heftier ball on the ‘y’ make a return appearance.

texasmonthly:

A One-Question Interview with TJ Tucker, TEXAS MONTHLY’s creative director

How did the logo change? 


   There have been three iterations of the TEXAS MONTHLY logo since the magazine started in 1973. The original logo (seen at top) used Pistilli Roman, an existing typeface that was popular in the early seventies. When [former TEXAS MONTHLY art director] D.J. Stout changed the logo in 1990, he asked Dennis Ortiz Lopez to draw something taller and more compressed to achieve a look that he though would look better sitting at the top of a magazine. The ball terminals on the ‘a’ and the ‘y’ lost some of their weight and the letters were noticeably thinner. 
    I began working on the third version in 2008, and much like D.J., I let the previous versions of the logo inspire my decisions. I didn’t want to make drastic changes, but I wanted to add back in some of the character of the 1973 logo, which I loved. We brought back the fatter ball terminals and added very small ball terminals to the serif of the ‘e’ and the lowercase ‘t.’ We also brought back the curve at the top of the lowercase ‘t.’ The differences may seem minor, but to me, it’s the details that complete the experience. 

Because these kinds of things are rather important. I remember being a bit floored when I saw the new logo on a grocery store newsstand as a young teenager — I loved the sleekness and even-ness of the mid-period logo, but I am happy to see the delicate curve on the lower case ‘t’ and the heftier ball on the ‘y’ make a return appearance.

girlsgetbusyzine:

fremsley:

Daphne & Delia

Daphne Oram, co-founder of the BBC RADIOPHONIC WORKSHOP (1950s), and pioneer electronic music composer/performer. Delia Derbyshire, likewise (1960s) and known for her turning Ron Grainer’s tune into the original Dr Who theme but notable for SO much more.  Two women you can’t know enough about.

LISTEN TO THE DELIAN MIX

Friday afternoon listening! Lots of old faves on this, highly recommended.

(via tardisadventures)

networkawesome:

Doc - Brian Eno 71-77: The Man Who Fell To Earth
Excellent, in-depth doc on Brian Eno during his incredibly creative and fertile years beginning with Roxy Music and continuing with his remarkable early solo material 

I watched part of this earlier today; it really is quite fantastic.

networkawesome:

Doc - Brian Eno 71-77: The Man Who Fell To Earth

Excellent, in-depth doc on Brian Eno during his incredibly creative and fertile years beginning with Roxy Music and continuing with his remarkable early solo material 

I watched part of this earlier today; it really is quite fantastic.